My Home Is Not My Home is an astonishing, heart-warming and shocking exhibition… a very emotional experience. What I came out feeling most of all is respect for these women: for what they have suffered, and how they are coming through it in ways that are truly inspiring. 

Professor Kate Nash, Author of Political Sociology of Human Rights 
and Co-Director of Centre for the Study of Global Media and Democracy

MY HOME IS NOT MY HOME – EXHIBITIONS PAST AND CURRENT

The Cubitt Gallery London 7 – 11 August 2019

Stephen Lawrence Gallery London 11 July – 14 August 2019
with KEEP THE DOOR OF MY LIPS: Understanding the Unspoken Cost of Work in Victorian/Austerity Britain

l’etrangere London 16 – 26 January 2019

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“A very moving and powerful exhibition”

L’Etrangere, Shoreditch, London

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IN THE MEDIA

In some areas of London, Filipino domestic workers are a fairly familiar sight.  But very few of us see these women in the homes in which they work, and where they live in London.  And where many of them suffer violence, threats and insults.  Moreover, few of us know that the ‘hostile environment’ the UK government is deliberately creating, is making those homes even more dangerous. Here we learn important facts about the political conditions of the women’s lives.  But what is most striking about the exhibition is the personal stories the women tell – in the film Tassia Kobylinska and Joyce Jiang made with some of those who’ve escaped and who’ve formed the NGO ‘Voice of Domestic Workers’, and in the objects collected in the exhibition: letters, clothes, photographs. They make it possible to really imagine and feel what it’s like to live like this, to be in these women’s shoes. You can better understand the difficulties they face, and you can also feel the joy: how they share experiences, and how they help each other.  I really found it a very emotional experience, and what I came out feeling most of all is respect for these women: for what they have suffered, and how they are coming through it in ways that are truly inspiring. 

Professor Kate Nash, Author of Political Sociology of Human Rights and Co-Director of Centre for the Study of Global Media and Democracy

 


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